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Why Nestle-Aland Is No Longer The Leader

Griesbach, Lachmann, Tischendorf, Tregelles, Westcott & Hort, Nestle-Aland, and the United Bible Societies are no longer the leader for many reasons. One of the main reasons is that they do not use advanced technologies; especially, digigraphic technologies.
Why Nestle-Aland Is Wrong

Griesbach, Lachmann, Tischendorf, Tregelles, Westcott & Hort, Nestle-Aland, and the United Bible Societies are wrong because their principles are incomplete. They do not accept all of the principles found in the Bible. They only accept those Bible principles accepted by people who do not believe the Bible.

The Sanity Interview

Interviewer: Dr. Bisconti, what Greek-Hebrew text did the King James Bible translators enshrine (teach us to respect above all others)?
Dr. Bisconti: None, though we know what sources they used, including, among others, Textus Receptus texts and Masoretic texts, and their sources reveal that they were more interested in truth than tradition.

Interviewer: Why, then, do you enshrine the (Greek-Hebrew) Digigraph Text?
Dr. Bisconti: We don’t.

Interviewer: What, then, is the purpose of the Digigraph Text?
Dr. Bisconti: People need a digigraphic, not human, summary of the unimaginably massive amount of manuscript and other data that must be processed by scholars.

Interviewer: Does the Digigraph Text agree with the sources used by the King James Bible translators?
Dr. Bisconti: Yes, but the Digigraph Text, through the Bisconti tags, (digitally) references an additional one trillion pages of source data, information, and principles.

Ironwrit
The Digigraph Text

The Final Greek & Hebrew Texts



Our Auxiliary Computer CenterFirstThe Bible teaches that there can be only one correct family of compilations (Greek-Hebrew texts [group {singular} of compilations]) of all of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible and this is the King James Bible family of compilations of all of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible. The difference(s) between the compilations is alphabetic and neither orthographic (relating to spelling) nor semantic (relating to meaning); for example, here is the name of God in two different Hebrew alphabets:

Hebrew Alphabets

Changing the alphabet did not change the meaning. Changing the alphabet did not change God’s message. Changing the alphabet aided understanding.

AutowritWikiwritManuscript PortalLionwrit VaultNotice: Our website is in constant flux because of the never-ending, frequent updating of our content while on-line. This means, at times, there may appear to be errors and broken links. Just wait a short time and they will correct themselves.

Compilation Matrix

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The Bible teaches that there can be only one correct family of compilation matrixes (Greek-Hebrew text collections [groups {plural} of compilations]) of all of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible and this is the King James Bible family of compilation matrixes of all of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible.

Every translation of the Bible is based on a compilation matrix, not a compilation. A compilation is a Greek-Hebrew text. A compilation matrix is a collection of compilations. The King James Bible and the IAV (International Authorized Version) are based on a compilation matrix, not a compilation. The compilations we provide on our website our only a part of the compilation matrix upon which the King James Bible and the IAV (International Authorized Version) are based.

So, what is the compilation matrix and how do we know it is God’s compilation matrix?

The compilation matrix for the 1611 King James Bible consists of: (1) largely, the Masoretic text (Hebrew source), (2) in a minor way, the Septuagint (Greek source), (3) largely, the Textus Receptus (Stephanus [Greek source]), (4) in a minor way, the Latin Vulgate (Latin source), and (5) other sources (Hebrew, Greek, etc.).  Also, we note, in passing, that the original-languages Old Testament was written a bit in Aramaic.

How do we know what is God’s compilation matrix? There are two ways to know. The first is extremely complex and would take years to explain. The second is extremely simple and it is that we now have direct verification of the Hebrew and Greek manuscripts through digigraphic technology, which uses the principles of the Bible itself (digigraph principles).  We note, in passing, that 1% of 1% of 1% of the digigraph principles are identical to the principles of Tischendorf, Nestle-Aland, and all other linguistic scholars put together.

Now, why haven’t we gotten rid of the compilation matrix and why don’t we have only a compilation today? Principally, because of our movement from the multilingual compilation matrix of the 1611 King James Bible to the seemingly infinitely lingual compilation matrix we have today.

Finally, remember, that the compilations we provide on our website are not the compilation matrix and, therefore, do not have final authority.  However, they are reliable compilations.  We will be publishing the compilation matrix as soon as possible.  Incidentally, the compilation matrix will look like a compilation, though it is technically different from a compilation.

Follow-Up

The compilation matrix will be found at Ironwrit.

 

Compilations

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The Bible teaches that there can be only one correct family of compilations (Greek-Hebrew texts [group {singular} of compilations]) of all of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible and this is the King James Bible family of compilations of all of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible. The difference(s) between the compilations is alphabetic and neither orthographic (relating to spelling) nor semantic (relating to meaning); for example, here is the name of God in two different Hebrew alphabets:

Hebrew Alphabets

Changing the alphabet did not change the meaning. Changing the alphabet did not change God’s message. Changing the alphabet aided understanding.

The following are Greek and Hebrew texts based on all of the ancient manuscripts:

View in your browser: Greek New Testament with Bisconti Numbers

View in your browser: Hebrew Old Testament with Bisconti Numbers

 

Translations

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The Bible teaches that there can be only one correct family of translations in any language. In English, it is the King James Bible family of translations.

The only correct English translations of the only correct compilations of the ancient manuscripts of the Bible are the King James Bible and the IAV (International Authorized Version), which differs from the King James Bible in providing modern spelling for a number of words; for example, “loves” instead of “loveth.” All other English Bibles are, at best, very good Bible commentaries. You can read the IAV, which includes the King James Bible, in your browser, here: International Authorized Version or you can download it using the button below.


Visit the IAV (International Authorized Version) website to download advanced editions of the IAV and other important tools.

Fake English Bibles

We collected all of the non-KJV, non-IAV English Bibles in existence and ran a series of digigraphic tests against each of them. They all failed the test series, though some did not fail as badly as others. View the test results in your browser, here: Fake English Bibles or you can download the results using the button below.


 

Manuscript Holograms

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Biblical Manuscripts Hyperspatial Holography:
4-Dimensional Holograms

Copyright 2015 Dr. Michael J. Bisconti

 

We have a unique methodology for storing the ancient manuscripts of the Bible – holograms.  In addition, we use a new type of hologram, one that stores information in 4, rather than 3, dimensions.  We call these holograms “4D holograms.”  Also, we have developed a compressed form of 4D hologram.

The compressed 4D holograms use a base template and DCMCs (Distinguishing Characteristic Modification Codes [commonly called “docmocs”]).  Here is the base template:

Base TemplateWe call this template the “Universal Manuscript Interference” or “UMI” for short.  The DCMCs, docmocs, are used in conjunction with the base template, the UMI, to create the manuscript holograms.  Here is an example of a docmoc:

log(1) + sine(1) + vector(1)

This docmoc is translated into a numerical value that modifies the base template to create the 4D hologram of a specific Biblical manuscript.  In this case, the 4D hologram is of a portion of the Book of Revelation:

RevelationNow the beauty of this template-docmoc methodology is that we can store all of the 4D holograms in a very small space.

 

Biblical Manuscript Hologram Codes (Docmocs)

Featured

Type

Date

Description

Location

Docmocs

Papyrus

Unknown

Manuscript on papyrus;
1 leaf, fragmentary; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Genesis, Enoch and Romans.
Fragments include folio 18 of P46 (BP II). Images from the Chester Beatty
Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty
Library

1.381773291

Papyrus

4th Century

Fourth century
manuscript on papyrus; 8 Leaves + 1 fragment plate, single column, up to 44
lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint); Enoch and Melito. Images from
the Chester Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty
Library

0.794180586

Papyrus

3rd or 4th Century

Third or fourth
century manuscript on papyrus; 8 leaves, single column; Contents: the
Apocryphon of Jannes and Jambres the Magicians. Images are from the Chester
Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty
Library

-0.37175123

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Welcome & Introduction

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Saturday, September 5, 2015 6:50 pm CST

Welcome to the launch of the new, repurposed Lionwrit website.  Lionwrit is the repository for every ancient biblical manuscript in existence, in actual/facsimile/shadow form, which we refer to as the “Textual Super Matrix (Empirical Form).”  One of the reasons that this reference is important is that it dissolves the “artificial” (note quotes) concept of the ancient manuscripts as existing in disparate domains (see our 2005 – 2011 page The “Father of All Bibles”).  Here is a key point from that page (some punctuation corrected here):

The textual debate has been discovered to be a subtextual (super interpretive [relating to super interpretation {“interpretation”}]) debate. This means the issue was really never one of “Which text is correct?” but was rather one of “Which subtextualization (super interpretation [‘interpretation’] of the one and only text is correct?”

Here is a simplified form of the above statement:

The issue was really never one of “Which text is correct?” but rather of “Which ‘interpretation’ (note quotes) of the one and only text is correct?”

In other words:

We build on all of the ancient manuscripts taken collectively (together) to reconfirm the original languages text.  Now, how do we “interpret” (note quotes) the ancient manuscripts (by “interpret” we mean understand, not translate)?

The answer is:

Digigraphic technology is the best methodology of “interpreting” (note quotes) the ancient manuscripts.  Note that we acknowledge the historic work of Tischendorf, Nestle-Aland, and others, without whom our work in digigraph technology would be impossible.

In 1965, at the age of sixteen, Dr. Bisconti wrote in The Aurum Records, the compilation of his thousands of personal journals:

The collecting of all of the ancient biblical manuscripts may take years, even up to half a century, but it is about time that someone undertook this monumental task.  Note that by “collecting of all” we do not necessarily mean the collecting of the actual manuscripts themselves.  In some cases, we will use facsimilies.  In other cases, shadows.  We will explain what shadows are later.

The fact is that it is better that all of the actual ancient manuscripts are scattered throughout the world because of the fanatics that seek to destroy them.  Putting all the manuscripts in one place would make it far less difficult for the fanatics to achieve their goal.

Lionwrit was founded by Chicago Christian University.  Among other things, Lionwrit and Chicago Christian University support the King James Bible and are the authors of the IAV (International Authorized Version).

(Our previous Lionwrit website is located at http://solutionsocc.com/lionwrit.htm.)

Dr. Michael J. Bisconti

Old Testament Manuscripts

Abisha Scroll

Aleppo Codex

Ben Asher Manuscripts

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia

British Museum Codex

Cairo Codex

Cairo Geniza Fragments

Codex Babylonicus Petropolitanus

Codex Cairensis

Codex Leningradensis

Codex Orientales 4445

Codex Reuchlinanus

Damascus Pentateuch

Dead Sea Scrolls

Erfurt Codices

First Rabbinic Bible

Kitag Gi-Hulaf

Leningrad Codex (Codex Leningradensis)

Michigan Codex

Nash Papyrus

Reuchlin Codex

Samaritan Pentetuch

 

In addition, we reference the following translations:

Septuagint

Origen Septuagint

Peshitta

Targum

Vulgate

 

We also reference:

Rabbinic Literature

Lionwrit Vault: New Testament Manuscripts

The following are lists of New Testament manuscripts currently being loaded into the Lionwrit Vault:

New Testament Papyri

New Testament Uncials

New Testament Minuscules

           New Testament Minuscules (1–1000)

           New Testament Minuscules (1001–2000)

           New Testament Minuscules (2001–)

New Testament Lectionaries

Manuscript Collections & Collection Hubs: Sacred and Secular

Unlike all other manuscript centers and websites, we cross-reference every Biblical manuscript with every other Biblical manuscript and, in addition, we cross-reference every Biblical manuscript with every relevant, major secular manuscript.

Note: A “collection hub” is a collection of collections.

A

American manuscript collections

American
Manuscripts.

University of Texas Archives and Manuscripts Section of the Center for American
History

Harry Ramson Humanities
Research Center

American literary manuscripts. University of Texas

Juilliard Manuscript
Collection

The Juilliard Manuscript Collection is a collection of 140 priceless autograph
manuscripts, sketches, engravers proofs and first editions.

Australian manuscript collections

Australian literary
manuscripts.

The database consists of electronic guides for more than eighty collections of
Australian literary manuscripts.

B

Bible manuscripts

Codex Sinaiticus
Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten
well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek,
including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. The Codex Sinaiticus
Project is an international collaboration to reunite the entire manuscript in
digital form and make it accessible to a global audience for the first time.

Dead Sea Scrolls

Scrolls From The Dead Sea. Library of Congress exhibition.

Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls

UCLA Qumran Visualization Project

Dead Sea Scrolls Institute

Dead Sea scrolls, Wikipedia entry.

Gutenberg Bible. Gutenberg Digital, The Göttenberg  Gutenberg Bible, Germany.
View by chapter and page. All 1282 pages of both volumes. Johann Gutenberg: His Life.

Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan.
Manuscripts, indices, codices, Leonardo da Vinci manuscripts.

Biblioteca Vaticana
The Vatican Library, Rome.

Bibliothèque Nationale de France manuscript collection.

Mandragore, base iconographique du département des Manuscrits

Blogs

Boston Public Library
Boston Public Library hosts a huge collection of rare books,  manuscripts,
maps, musical scores and prints, including several first edition folios by
William Shakespeare.

Bodlean Library Illuminated Manuscript
Collection, Oxford University.

Digital facsimiles of complete manuscripts, scanned directly from the originals.
The site provides access to over 80 early manuscripts now in institutions
associated with the University of Oxford.

British Library manuscript collections

British Library
‘Turning the Pages’ manuscript website.

The Lindisfarne Gospels, the Diamond Sutra, the Sforza Hours, the Leonardo
notebook, the Golden Haggadah, the Luttrell Psalter, Blackwell’s Herbal,
Vesalius and the Sherborne Missal and others.

British literary manuscript collections

British
Literary Manuscripts Online, c. 1660?1900

British Literary Manuscripts Online, c. 1660-1900 is the first release in
Gale?s British Literary Manuscripts Online series. This extensive digital
archive includes hundreds of thousands of pages of poems, plays, essays,
novels, diaries, journals, correspondence and other manuscripts from the
Restoration through the Victorian era. These  documents can now be
accessed by students, instructors and researchers everywhere.

Bodlian Library,
Oxford University, Luna database of manuscripts.

A collaboration between ARTstor and the Bodleian Library to produce 25,000
images from 35mm filmstrip negatives and positive slides. Material includes
medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts.

Buddhist manucripts

Buddhist manuscripts.
The Early Buddhist Manuscript Project. The British Library and The University
of Washington. Scrolls written in the Kharosthi script and the Gandhari
(Prakrit) language.

Chester Beatty Library
Permanent exhibitions of eastern and western manuscripts, sacred texts and
miniature paintings.

Byzantine manuscripts

Center for the Study of New Testament
Manuscripts

Producing digital photographs of extant Greek New Testament manuscripts and
announcing new discoveries.
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External Scholarship: CSNTM:
New Testament Manuscripts

Type

Date

Description

Location

Shelf Number

Papyrus

Unknown

Manuscript on papyrus; 1 leaf, fragmentary; Contents: LXX
(Septuagint) Genesis, Enoch and Romans. Fragments include folio 18 of P46 (BP
II). Images from the Chester Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty Library

CBL BP 190

Papyrus

4th Century

Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 8 Leaves + 1
fragment plate, single column, up to 44 lines per column; Contents: LXX
(Septuagint); Enoch and Melito. Images from the Chester Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty Library

CBL BP XII

Papyrus

3rd or 4th Century

Third or fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 8 leaves,
single column; Contents: the Apocryphon of Jannes and Jambres the Magicians.
Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty Library

CBL BP XVI

Papyrus

4th Century

Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 4 leaves, single
column, up to 34 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint): Psalms
72.6–88.2 (sans Ps76). Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty Library

Rahlfs 2149 (CBL BP XIII)

Papyrus

4th Century

Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 1 leaf, single
column, 30 lines per column. Contents: LXX (Septuagint): Psalms 31, 26, and
2. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.

Dublin, Chester Beatty Library

Rahlfs 2150 (CBL BP XIV)


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New Testament:
Manuscript Locations: First Draft

This is the first draft of our record of New Testament manuscript locations.  It is far from what it will be but it is a good start.

Albanian Nat. Arch. Nr 1, Tirana, Albania
Allentown, Penn., Muhlenberg Coll., Thol. Pap. 3
Amsterdam, Univ. Bibl., GX 200
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor (Images available at CSNTM)
Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Library, Inv. 6238
Ann Arbor, University of Michigan, Inv. 6652.
Athens
Athens, Ntl Libr, Grk 2106
Athos & elsewhere
Athos; Paris
Barcelona
Barcelona, Fundació Sant Lluc Evangelista, P. Barc. 6
Basel
Berkeley, Palestine Institute Museum, Pacific School of Religion, Pap. 2
Berlin

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New Testament:
Common Manuscripts: List

We are aware that many of our readers are not scholars and that some of these readers are sensitive with regard to denominational and other religious references when it comes to works of scholarship. For that reason we must point out that the term “Catholic Epistles” has nothing to do with any denomination or religion that uses the word “Catholic” in their name.

Terminology

Catholic Epistles = James, I and II Peter, I, II, and III John, and Jude

Abbreviations

a = Acts & Catholic Epistles (actus apostolorum et epistulae catholicae)
cath = Catholic Epistles (epistulae catholicae)
e = Gospels (evangelia)
p = Epistles of Paul (epistulae paulinae)
r = Revelation (revelatio)
* = Constant witness cited explicitly in critical apparatus
+ = codex mutilatus (mutilated book)
K = textus cum commentario (text with commentary)
l = lectionarium (lectionary)
VSC = VSC Code = formerly, a reference code used by a Sentry 9X virtual supercomputer

 

VSC Manuscript No. Century Bibliotheca Containing
10 *Papyrus 1 III Philadelphia, Univ. of Penns., Mt 1,1-9.12.14-20
12 Univ. Mus., E 2746; P. Oxy. 2
18 *Papyrus 2 VI Firenze, Mus. Archeol., Inv. Jo 12,12-15
20 7134
26 *Papyrus 3 VI/VII Wien, Österr. Nat. Bibl., Pap. Lc 7,36-45; 10,38-42
28 G. 2323
34 *Papyrus 4 III Paris, Bibl. Nat., Suppl. Gr. Lc 1,58-59; 1,62-2,1.6-7;
36 1120 3,8-4,2.29-32.34-35; 5,3-8; 5,30-6,16
42 *Papyrus 5 III London, Brit. Libr., Inv. 782. Jo 1,23-31.33-40; 16,14-30;
44 2484; P. Oxy. 208. 1781 20,11-17.19-20.22-25
50 *Papyrus 6 IV Strasbourg, Bibl. Nat. et Jo 10,1-2.4-7.9-10; 11,1-8.45-52
52 Univ., Pap. copt. 379. 381.
54 382.384
60 Papyrus 7 IV-VI(?) olim: Kiev, Ukrain. Nat. Bibl., Lc 4,1-2
62 Petrov 553

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